Skip to the main content of this page?
Find other sites and services by the City of Greater Sudbury
Greater Sudbury Airport
greater sudbury airport logo
Greater Sudbury Airport
Your journey begins with us. Avoid the hassles of the highway and travel worry-free with the Greater Sudbury Airport. Check here for arrivals, departures, traveller information and more!
Your Local Library
greater sudbury public library logo
Your Local Library
Greater Sudbury Public Library is proud to offer a wide range of bilingual services and collections which meet the information and leisure needs of all ages.
Heritage Museums
sudbury museums logo
Heritage Museums
Discover our rich past. Explore four local museums through digital imaging, audio and video. The site also features the INCO Triangle Digital Archives.
Invest Sudbury
invest sudbury logo
Invest Sudbury
The Greater Sudbury Development Corporation is the engine for local economic development. Explore initiatives to attract, develop and retain business in our city.
Sudbury Tourism
sudbury tourism logo
Sudbury Tourism
Greater Sudbury is a place for adventure. Choose from world-renowned attractions, urban comforts and outdoor getaways. Packages are available.
Regional Business Centre
regional business centre logo
Regional Business Centre
Let us help you find what you need to succeed. Our not-for-profit organization provides information and resources to fund, launch and grow your business, free of charge.

Greater Sudbury

Bears

The City of Greater Sudbury, Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry and Greater Sudbury Police Service are proud to partner to launch Report-A-Bear, a peer-to-peer online mapping tool for residents to share information about bear sightings within Greater Sudbury.


Report-A-Bear

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Bears

For more information on Black Bears, visit:

About Black Bears

Bears are very opportunistic in what they eat. Their main diet consists of roots, grasses, insects, berries, but they will also eat carrion (dead animals) on occasion. These eating habits play an important ecological function by cycling nutrients and acting as ‘restoration ecologists’ by dispersing seeds as well as aiding decomposition by tearing apart stumps and logs while foraging for insects. Bears are also occasional carnivores, preying on old or sick animals thereby helping to keep the prey populations healthy. They can easily develop a taste for human food and garbage so it’s important to never feed these animals.

It is a common misconception that bears hibernate during the winter months. Rather, they enter a period of torpor, which is a short-term reduction in body temperature. The bear’s ability to remain inactive during winter months might one day provide insight into the treatment of various human diseases.

Black bears rouse from their torpor in late March or early April and begin to emerge from their winter dens. Bears lose 20-40% of their body weight over the winter so they’re very hungry when they emerge. An easy meal is just what the opportunistic bear is after so it’s time to lock up your garbage and put bird feeders away.

Keep bears away:

Consider keeping your garbage in airtight containers inside your house, garage or shed . Place your garbage at the curb or roadside by 7 a.m. on your collection day and not the previous evening. Plastic garbage bags alone do not provide protection from bears, birds and other animals. Consider placing bagged refuse in an approved garbage container. Regularly washing containers with a strong smelling disinfectant can help reduce odours.

- If a bear poses an immediate threat to personal safety, 9-1-1 should be called.   

- If there is no immediate threat to personal safety, the resident will be directed to call the Bear Reporting Line toll free 1-866-514-2327. The line is operated by the MNR as part of the Bear Wise program. It operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week from April to November. Trained staff can provide advice and information about bear behaviour and how to remove attractants from their property.

Frequently Asked Questions about Bears

For more information on Black Bears, visit: